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Eagle Harbor Book Group, 2007

Book and Meeting Schedule, Summer, 2007

June 24 w/Joanne Bollinger: 3 Cups of Tea and Mountains Beyond Mountains
Venue: Shirley Flood (About four miles from Eagle Harbor off Hwy 26, pass Lake Bailey parking area. Watch for sign "Little Silver River;" continue to top of rise in road. My drive is the last one on the access road. When you get to the bunkhouse, the drive curves right. Early birds can park close to my house - others can park on the grassy areas near the bunkhouse.)
Food: Sue Church and ?

July 8 w/Mary Strohl: Everyman
Venue: Pat Ryan's
Food: Ginny Jamison, Clint and Mary Thomas

July 22 w/Sue Church: Kafka on the Shore
Venue: St. Peters Basement
Food: Joanne Bollinger and ?
Click for an interesting interview with Murakami

August 5 w/ John and Louise Marta: The World is Flat
Venue: the Marta's
Food: ? ?

August 19 w/Ginny Jamison: Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking
Venue: St Peters Undercroft
Food: Ruth Mohr and Caryl Mobley.

August 26 Poetry Night
Venue: Van Pelt's
Food: ? ?

September 9 w/Paul Freshwater: Water for Elephants
Venue: Freshwater's
Food: ? ?

Voting Results for 2007

The complete voting results are not available at this time.

Nominations and Discussion, Summer 2007

3 Cups of Tea by Greg Mortenson and David Oliver Relin.

Joanne writes: The story of one American's mission to build schools in the remotest corners of Pakistan and Afghanistan (non-fiction)

An astonishing, inspiring adventure. Go to http\\ www.threecupsoftea.com for more info, book reviews, etc. If you purchase books online, go through the website and 7% of your book purchases will go toward a girls' education scholarship fund in Pakistan and Afghanistan.

With her vote Joanne votes also for Mountains Beyond Mountains and says: I offer to lead a 2-for-one night on these books for their fascinating portrayals of two very unusual, fearless men who are accomplishing extraordinary things in international education and health. They are quick reads but I wouldn't expect that everyone would read both.

With her final vote Mary Strohl writes: My final vote is for 2 for one night--Three cups of Tea and Mountains Beyond Mountains. Reading the inspirational, humanitarian accomplishments of these two remarkable persons would be a good balance to today's newspapers. I went to the website Joanne recommended for Three cups of Tea and learned that Mortensen failed climbing to the top of K2 mountain peak and achieved instead, against incredible odds, opening a school in this remote mountain village in Pakistan. I've read about half of Mountains Beyond Mountains and it is a good, true story also. The two books would make a great discussion. Mary Strohl

Mountains Beyond Mountains by Tracy Kidder

Ruth Mohr writes:

My suggestion: . The story of Paul Farmer, Harvard-educated physician and medical anthropologist who started a clinic for the poorest of the poor in Haiti while still in medical school. He went on to found Partners in Health which took on TB in Peru and is now working on HIV/AIDS in Rwanda. For those interested in what individuals can do, this is a fascinating read. I found it hard to put down.

With her vote for this title Joanne also votes for 3 Cups of Tea and writes: I offer to lead a 2-for-one night on these books for their fascinating portrayals of two very unusual, fearless men who are accomplishing extraordinary things in international education and health. They are quick reads but I wouldn't expect that everyone would read both.

With her final vote Mary Strohl writes: My final vote is for 2 for one night--Three cups of Tea and Mountains Beyond Mountains. Reading the inspirational, humanitarian accomplishments of these two remarkable persons would be a good balance to today's newspapers. I went to the website Joanne recommended for Three cups of Tea and learned that Mortensen failed climbing to the top of K2 mountain peak and achieved instead, against incredible odds, opening a school in this remote mountain village in Pakistan. I've read about half of Mountains Beyond Mountains and it is a good, true story also. The two books would make a great discussion. Mary Strohl

Everyman by Philip Roth

Sue writes: Philip Roth, surely one of America's most respected/awarded and unread authors. Everyman, a man looking for meaning in his last years, remembering--a journey in which many of us older foks can join him.

With her vote Sue Church writes: Everyman should be a good discussion as many of us are at that later stage of life and doing some review and remembering and summing up.

Kafka on the Shore by Haruki Murakami

Sue writes: A magical realism by a terrific story teller. With her vote Sue Church writes: Kafka on the Shore would be either loved or hated (discuss!), characters are in several life stages, some mystical/magicalbelievable bits, "a tour de force of metaphysical realism," fierce and compassionate--just great storytelling.

With her vote Joanne says: If Sue Church agrees to lead and help us make sense of it.

The World is Flat Thomas Friedman

Clint adds: I was impressed by Friedman's insight when I read this last year and put a comment on our own web. You can click the title's navigation bar at the top of www.clintnmary.org (right click and choose 'back' to return here.)With her vote Joanne writes: We must do something timely.

Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking by Malcolm Gladwell.

Ginny Jamison writes:

This is a book "about how we think without thinking, about choices that seem to be made in an instant - in the blink of an eye- that actually aren't as simple as they seem. ... How do brains really work - in the office, in the classroom, in the kitchen, and in the bedroom? And why are the best decisions often those that are impossible to explain to others?"

Water for Elephants by Sara Gruen

Paul writes:
A 2006 New York Times fiction best seller, it's a gripping tale about circus life during the Depression, related as flashbacks from a nonagenarian nursing home patient and veterinarian who lived through it, with surprising and delightful endings to both his current and remembered situations.

Ginny Jamison adds:

I think that Water for Elephants, Paul Freshwater's choice is one of the most delightful and insightful books I have read in a while. Not only does it give a picture of the circus in the 1930s but also the life of a 90 or 93 year in an assisted living home. The narrative moves with ease throughout with a wonderful plot and great characterization. Ginny Jamison

With her vote Mary Strohl wirtes: Can't pass up a book that is "equal parts adventure, mystery, fictional memoir, love story." Amazon review also says it has depth and substance not found in your typical beach read.

With her vote Joanne says: Sounds like a winner to me

Clint notes: Camel's problem, Jake Walk, was a real condition in the thirties. Click for a blurb about it.